Art Gallery Dayboro

EACH MONTH THE DAYBORO ART GALLERY SHARES WITH YOU SOME OF THE FINER POINTS OF OUR BRILLIANT ARTIST AND ART ITSELF. LEARN ABOUT THEIR PASSIONS, MOTIVATION AND UNIQUE ASPECTS TO THEIR STYLES AND TECHNIQUS. INDULGE IN OUR ARTS COMMUNITY AND IN DOING SO BECOME PART OF THE FAMILY

Sharon Harper Greentree

Sharon works in oils on linen and black/white graphics on paper. She has been developing landscape themes over several years and continues to develop concepts which challenge the way the environement is seen and understood. Her recent series the 'Black Snake Creek Project', is based on a regional creek environment, challenged with man made and naturally occuring difficulties. From drawings done en plein air at the source, the idea of viewing, eg the growing tree, through naturally occuring slippages and weathering, intrigues and suggests the otherness of landscape, the unseen boulders, root systems, layers of strata rocks and debris. For Sharon the concept of visible landscape cannot be understood without the unseen.

 

Majella Holton

Majella has very recently completed a Bachelor of Creative Arts which reflects her love of learning and new experience. Her preferred medium is watercolour, but also works with inks, pastels, oils, acrylics, print making and digital photography. She has won major awards at regional shows across a variety of mediums and themes. She enjoys creating landscapes, portraiture and contemporary works. Her profile acknowledges her gratitude to Moreton Bay Regional Council for building the "magnificent purpose built gallery within the wonderful community of Dayboro", because it creates opportunity for local artists and creatives to expand their passion for art.

 

Helen Hornibrook.

Helen was bought up on a farm in Central Queensland's Yeppoon and attributes this to her artistic interest in seascapes and country landscape. She worked for many years as a florist, which led her to appreciate the immense scope that painting would lend her to explore the use of colour, composition, shape and texture. She works with oils watercolours and acrylics, and although landscape is her main subject, she has won awards and prizes for her brightly coloured abstracts. She says the most gratifying and rewarding experience for her is to know that her work sells and is hanging and being enjoyed in many peoples homes, and completely recommends painting to anyone looking for a hobby or pastime, "give it a go" is her call to all those out there wondering what to do next.

 

DAG Artistic Insights - Landscapes

Dayboro Art Gallery Artists of the Month for May, are Sharon Harper Greentree, Majella Holton and Helen Hornibrook. Once again these three artists represent the quality, diversity and talent that exists within our community. All have many years of creative experience and learning, participation in exhibitions, experimentation through different mediums and styles and ongoing development of their arts practice.

 

Where to start?

1. Location! Whether you have picked up a brush/pen/ pencil before or have done it a thousand times, your subject is one of the most important aspects of a landscape artwork. I know, logical right, but there is more to it than that. Find  a location with that wow! Spot, that sends tingles down your spine, whether it is the beauty, colours, powerful presence or magical vastness. It is not only important to your audience, but can help overcome some imperfections in your craft and mean the difference to being fully happy with your work, and being motivated and passionate till the end.

 

“The most important thing for me as an artist, when I create a landscape, is to invoke a mood in the artwork which the viewer may respond to. I enjoy doing scenes from my holidays both in Australia and overseas. I usually go for a calming or tranquil scene when painting landscapes and this applies to all mediums: water colour, oils or pastels” one of our feature artists of the month Majella Holton

 

You don’t always have the time to do an artwork when you do come across that spot, so always be ready to take a snap on your phone or camera. Remember, you should not use photos found on the internet or books unless you are given permission from the photographer.

 

But the best option, whenever possible do your landscape artwork on site. Why? Because it gives you the motivation, and a passion in your work that you may not get from a photo unless you are also a master photographer (and then you probably wouldn’t need to paint to capture that presence anyway lol) Observe, look around you, walk around to different locations. Once you have found that spot if possible visit the same spot at different times of day and watch the play of light. What is the thing that gives you that wow feeling? Colours, shadows etc….then it is time to begin

 

Another of our featured artists of the month at the Dayboro Art Gallery; Sharon Harper Greentree, is a good example of how important thorough observations of the landscape is. Sharon has found that to her what is important for a landscape is to consider both from above and below the ground. “The seen and the unseen. This allows the possibility of combining a realistic view with the more conceptual unseen, increasing the potential for the work to engage and intrigue.”